Tuesday, July 31, 2007

I've Been Tagged!

I've been tagged! . . . compliments of Trey Morgan. I have been directed to list eight random things about myself and then tag eight other bloggers. The first task should be rather simple (but certainly boring to anyone who reads my blog), but I am not even certain I know eight other bloggers (and one I do know tagged me :-)).

Here are my "8 Random Facts about Myself" . . . I'll have to keep working on the list of those I tag.

1. I live in the mountains of Colorado, but I'm a lousy skier

2. I attended kindergarten at the same school from which I (almost) graduated with a Master's degree

3. My football jersey number in high school was #74 . . . curiously, I played in exactly 74 football games while at Lubbock Christian Schools (counting junior high, junior varsity & varsity)

4. My parents, siblings, and myself all have names that start w/ "J"

5. As a freshmen in college I missed English class 26 times in one semester and still passed . . . don't ask me how

6. I have spent a little over 2 years of my life at summer camp (cumulative total)

7. Is it just me, or does eating lobster seem a lot like eating an overgrown cockroach?

8. Serano's in Chandler, Arizona makes the best enchiladas I have ever eaten

Sunday, July 29, 2007

Celebrating 70 Years of Service & Ministry


The Cortez Church of Christ, to whom I am blessed to preach every Sunday, celebrated its 70th anniversary today. It was a wonderful day. Many who had been a part of this fellowship in the past came to wroship with us today. It was a grand reunion.


I wrote the following article for our church bulletin this week.


Seventy years! That’s a long time.


In 1937, the year Christians began to meet in a small building on Main Street in Cortez, Franklin Roosevelt was beginning his second of four terms as President. In 1937, the Hindenburg burst into flames as it was mooring following its first trans-Atlantic flight. In 1937, the Golden Gate Bridge opened to traffic. In 1937, Japan invaded China, signaling the beginning of World War II. In 1937, Amelia Earhart’s plane disappeared. In 1937, J.R.R. Tolkien published The Hobbit. In 1937, Hank Williams began his singing career. In 1937, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs came to theaters, and Spencer Tracy won the Academy Award for Best Actor. In 1937, The New York Yankees defeated the New York Giants in the World Series, and the Washington Redskins defeated the Chicago Bears for the NFL title. In 1937, Cy Young was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. In 1937, the first Krispy Kreme Donut Shop opened, and Volkswagen was founded. In 1937, John D. Rockerfeller and George Gershwin died, and Merle Haggard, Colin Powell, Bill Cosby, and Brooks Robinson were born. In 1937, Pepperdine University was founded. In 1937, you could buy a baked ham for 39¢ a pound, a loaf of bread for 5¢, a Studebaker for $1,330, a Ford coupe for $625, and a 71-acre farm (complete with 6-room house) for $4,200.


In the past seventy years, there have been a lot of changes and a lot of happenings, but at least one thing has remained constant. The Cortez Church of Christ has remained committed to serving God faithfully and tirelessly. Our fellowship has consisted of countless men and women over the years, many who have long since gone on to their eternal home, but we share the bond that we have together in Christ.


Seventy years is a long time, but it is just a beginning. As the Lord wills, we, the Cortez Church of Christ will continue as we have in the past, faithfully and fervently serving our Lord and his cause.

Saturday, July 28, 2007

Update on Melanie

Thank you for the prayers said on behalf of Melanie and our family. Melanie is doing much better. She was released from the hospital on July 19 after having spent 26 days in hospitals in Wheat Ridge (Denver) and Durango. She and the girls left while I was at camp to go spend some time with her parents in Levelland, Texas. They should return home sometime next week.

There is power in prayer!

Prayer Matters


A few weeks ago, I started another blog . . . Prayer Matters. As the title suggests, it is a blog devoted to prayer. My daily posts included prayers written by others or me, prayers taken from Scripture, essays and insights on prayers, prayer requests, etc. I began the blog with the intent of inviting others to share their prayers, prayer requests, and insights on prayer.


When you've got time, drop by Prayer Matters. If you have something you want to contribute e-mail it to me, and I will post it. If you would like to be a frequent contributor, I will provide you access to edit the blog directly.

Friday, July 27, 2007

The President Came to Town

When I was five years old the President came to town. I stood with my family watching as the motorcade drove by us. From the window of his limousine, President Gerald Ford waved; I returned a salute. That is as close as I got to the President, but it is a day I will always remember.

Most people are fascinated with celebrities, and Presidents are some of the most recognized celebrities in the whole world. When the President comes to town, crowds gather and people vie for the opportunity to shake his hand and stand near him. Being in the presence of a famous person is exciting and is an event to remember.

A fellow by the name of Zacchaeus was caught up in the hoopla as a celebrity visited his hometown. Being a rather short man, he resorted to climbing a tree to catch a glimpse of the man. There, walking down the road, came the man and his entourage. The crowds cheered and a few of the onlookers even ran toward the man, desperately trying to touch him.

As the man came near the tree in which Zacchaeus was perched, he looked up and said, “Zacchaeus, hurry and come down; for I must stay at your house today.” Zacchaeus’s heart leapt with excitement. “Could it be?” he wondered. “Did I hear him right? Does he really want to come to my house today?”

The man meant what he had said: he came to Zacchaeus’s house on that day. That day was one Zacchaeus would always remember: it was the day that his life changed. His contact with a celebrity, not the President or an accomplished actor or athlete, but Jesus Christ, was the turning point in his life.

Most people are fascinated with celebrities. Many individuals will go to great lengths to catch a glimpse of or touch a famous person. To be in the presence of a celebrity is an experience to remember. But no celebrity can offer the power to affect a life more than Jesus Christ. He is more than celebrity, he is the Son of God, the One through whom God has offered life eternal.

To what lengths will you go in order to see the Savior?

Thursday, July 26, 2007

The Gift of Singing

Editor’s Note: I wrote the following in August 2002, following a camp session at Quartz Mountain Christian Camp in Oklahoma.

At camp two weeks ago, I was reminded of the gift of song. In attendance was a young camper, Brian, who loved to sing. He was not familiar with most of the words to the songs we sang, but still he sang. He was always out of tune, but still he sang. And, on his face, as he sang as loud as could be, there was a beaming smile.

Have we forgotten the gift of song? As we gather to worship, I look around as the songs are sung. The faces I see are often expressionless. Eyes are downcast. The words are more mumbled than spoken. Many just sit there, silent, thoughts wandering to who knows where. We hurry through the songs, to get to the real reason why we came. The songs are made an afterthought . . . a way to pass time? Have we forgotten the gift of song?

“Come, let us sing with joy to the Lord; let us shout aloud to the rock of our salvation.” These are the words of Psalm 95, a beautiful song of praise. Little Brian reminded me of these words as he sang with such passion.

What a wonderful gift God has given to us: the ability to lift our voices in song. We are commanded to sing to one another, but not in order to pass the time, or as a means to transition from one act of worship to another. We are commanded to sing to one another in order to encourage and to teach and to inspire and to uplift one another.

Singing is a rather unique act of worship in that we are called upon to join together in one action. A preacher preaches, the congregation listens. A prayer leader words a prayer, the church is present in spirit, but the words remain those of the leader. And, at the Table, our reflections are usually to ourselves. But, as we sing, our voices are lifted as one. We may sing different notes, and the words may not be the same for all, but the effect is singular . . . it is communal: a song from all those present is offered to God.

Come, let us sing with joy to the Lord; let us shout aloud to the rock of our salvation.

Wednesday, July 25, 2007

Another Great Camp!


Well, another week of camp is history. What a great week. Only 51 more weeks until the next one!


I'll be back into the daily blogging routine soon.

Sunday, July 15, 2007

My Favorite Place on Earth


Today, I am at my favorite place on earth: camp! I have expressed my feelings about Christian camping many times in this column, but I do not apologize for expressing them once again. There are few places on earth that facilitate a more profound effect on a person’s spiritual well-bring and growth (whether they be young or old) than a summer Christian camp.


My love for Christian camping was instilled in me through watching my grandparents, George and Laverne Saunders. For about 25 years they served as teachers and counselors at two camps: Boiling Spings Youth Camp, located outside of Woodward, Oklahoma; and Black Mesa Bible Camp, located in the far western Oklahoma panhandle. My camping career began at Boiling Springs when I was just an eight-year-old kid. I would spend 5 summers at Boiling Springs before moving on to Black Mesa and White River Youth Camp, near Crosbyton, Texas.


Dale Hukle fanned the flame of my love for camping and introduced me to serving on a camp staff. When I was in Junior High, he started Camp Followin’, a camp in New Mexico and sponsored by Green Lawn Church of Christ. Beginning as an 8th grader, I worked at Followin’ as a staff member; I returned each summer until I was in college, eventually directing a few sessions.


When I was 16 years old, Dale brought me to Camp Blue Haven, in New Mexico, where he was the director. For three summers, I washed pots and pans at Blue Haven for up to ten weeks a summer. I was paid $10 a week for my labor, but I was blessed beyond measure. Dale later introduced me to Christian Camp of the Rockies in Colorado and Soul Quest at York College. I would also spend time as a staff member at Pine Springs Youth Camp in New Mexico and Quartz Mountain Christian Camp in Oklahoma, where I directed 7 camps.


Over the past 29 years of my life, I have spent a cumulative total of over two years at summer camp. Each week is better than the one before. Even at 37 years of age, I am challenged during each camp session I attend. The time spent with God is so rich, full, and uncontested at camp. The fellowship with other, like-minded people is a tremendous blessing at camp—I don’t know how many thousands of people I have met at camp.


Are you involved with Christian camping? There is always a role for you to play: in your attendance, in your leadership, in your physical and monetary support, your held is needed. Get involved. You will be blessed more richly than you can imagine.

Friday, July 13, 2007

Our Bodies: God's Amazing Gift!


I am not sure who wrote the following article, but it is good. What a wonderful God we have!


It was a familiar scene. The young couple were going over the monthly bills, trying to stretch their money to cover their obligations. There will bills from the drug store, mall stores, gasoline companies, electric and water bills, etc. In an effort to break the tension, trying to be humorous, the husband said, “Isn’t it s good thing that God doesn’t bill us for the air we breath?”


A most serious thought was spoken lightheartedly. What if God decided to bill us for the wonderful body he has given us? The Psalmist said, “I will praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made” (Psalm 139.14).


What if God billed us for . . .


Our ears? A piano has 88 keys, but our ears have a keyboard of 1,500 keys. They are so finely tunes that you can hear the blood running through your vessels. The outside of your ears can catch up to 73,700 vibrations a second.


Our eyes? They are both microscopes and telescopes. They can gaze into the heavens and see a star millions of miles away, or inspect the smallest insect.


Our feet? Each foot has 26 bones, none of which is wider than your thumb. The foot is so manufactured (arched) with its ligaments, tendons, muscles and joints that a 300 pound man can put all his weight on these tiny bones.


Our heart? Its size is about the size of your fist, but pumps (beats) 4320 times an hour. In a year, your heart beats about 40 million times. A drop of blood can make a round trip in your circulatory system in only 22 seconds.


Yes, what if God sent us a bill for this marvelous body in which we live? Staggering, isn’t it? But God does not send bills. He just loves us and cares for us. Can we do any less that to return his love? We show him our love by obedience to his Word and by faithful stewardship of that which he has entrusted us.

Thursday, July 12, 2007

One of Satan's Most Destructive Tools

“A fool gives full vent to his anger, but a wise man keeps himself under control” (Prov. 29.11) That is the assessment of the wise man of Proverbs. He adds, “A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an insult” (12.16). And, “A fool is hotheaded and reckless. A quick-tempered man does foolish things” (15.16-17).

The Bible is filled with the folly of angry men. Cain killed his brother in anger. An angry King Saul relentlessly pursued David. Anger, among other evils, fueled Jezebel. In their anger, the chief priests and Pharisees sought to have Jesus killed.

Anger is a powerful weapon in Satan’s hands. Paul warns, “In your anger do not sin: do not let the sun go down while you are still angry, and do not give the devil a foothold” (Eph. 4.26-27). Anger that is left unchecked and unresolved can lead to great tragedy—violent outbursts, physical harm, emotional stress, family heartache, strained relationships, destroyed reputations.

Jesus taught about the danger of anger, most notably in his Sermon on the Mount. He equates the unchecked emotion of anger with murder, teaching that anger must be quickly resolved.
Among the first qualities given of an elder is that he is to be “temperate, self-controlled...gentle, not quarrelsome” (1 Tim. 3.2). To Titus, Paul instructs, an elder is to be “not over-bearing, not quick-tempered …self-controlled… disciplined” (1.7-8).

I struggle with my anger. Perhaps you do, as well. Let us strive to be even-tempered, showing the character of Christ in our relationships and in our dealings with one another, for anger is out of place in God’s family.

Wednesday, July 11, 2007

I Like Cucumbers!

It amazes me how much we change over time. Each glance in a mirror reminds us: we see a few more wrinkles here and there, a little graying on the top of our heads (or that ever-expanding bald spot!), added pounds, and the overall look of the aging process.

The changes wrought by the advancement of time are noticeable in other ways, as well. Our likes and dislikes, interests, hobbies, and sensibilities evolve through the years. There was a time, not that long ago, when I did not like cucumbers (unless they were pickled!). I avoided them, well, like George Bush 41 avoids broccoli. There was time when I cringed at the sound of a banjo and fiddle; today, bluegrass music is my favorite. Many years ago, I spent most of my nights playing computer games until dawn; today, I view such activity as a waste of time.

We do not always stay the same. Life is about changing, maturing, growing wiser. Without change, life remains stagnant, na├»ve, unproductive, unfortunate. The Apostle Paul said it best when he made this appeal in 1 Corinthians 13.11: “When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I put childish ways behind me.”

Childhood is a wonderful part of one’s life. I cherish my memories of growing up. Yet, childhood lasts for but a little while. In the scheme of a lifetime, it is only a small portion of one’s walk on this earth.

Have you changed in the course of your lifetime? Have you matured? Have you grown wiser? I hope the changes in your life have not merely been superficial—added wrinkles, graying hair, added pounds. I hope that the experiences of your life have made you sharper, more discerning. I hope that you have grown in your sense of responsibility and in your seriousness about life. I hope your personality has developed and has been tempered with reason, patience, and resolve. I hope your faith has grown and your dependence upon God has deepened.

Let us challenge one another to continually grow. For, without growth there can be no life.

Tuesday, July 10, 2007

Simple & Reverent Worship

As Israel came to worship, God demanded simplicity. In Exodus 20.24, he told his people, “You need make for me only an altar of earth.” It was not to be made of dressed stone. It was not to be atop a platform standing high in the sky. A simple earthen altar is all that God wanted.

Israel’s neighbors had erected elaborate and ornate temples in which to worship their gods. Pagan religion was a spectacle, a show, an event! Yet, Yahweh, the Lord of heaven and earth, demanded simple and reverent worship from his people.

I am reminded of the churches without walls that are so common in Third World countries. They are simple structures; basically, a few columns and a thatched roof—enough to keep worshipers shaded from the sun and protected from the rains. These structures are not much to look at, but they provide a place where Christians can gather and worship God. Each Sunday, thousands from all over India come to these place to pray, sing, study and commune.

Our world is filled with ancient cathedrals and modern arenas—ornate and imposing buildings constructed ostensibly to facilitate worship directed to God, but are they not really more for our sensibilities and comforts? I cannot comprehend the millions upon millions of dollars spent to build these structures and to keep them operating.

And, worship has become an event for so many, a show, great spectacle. Praise bands, graphic arts displays, Hollywood-style productions—and, yet, the Israelites were told, “You need make for me only an altar of earth.”

It is in the simplicity of our worship that the heart shines forth and the passion of our faith is most clearly seen. As we gather each week, let us join our voices in pure song, let us join our hearts and minds in prayer, let us open our ears to the honest and straightforward Word of God, and let us share at the table our remembrances of our Lord.

Monday, July 9, 2007

When Your View Is Obscured


I’d have a great view, if that building wasn’t in my way!


Do we not usually face much of life with such pessimism? We allow circumstances to dictate our outlook on life, rather than forge attitudes that transcend the moment and are attuned to something higher, something deeper.

That which is higher is the great hope we possess. I am reminded of the story of Dietrich Bonhoffer being led to his death in the Nazi gas chamber. Bonhoffer was a man of faith who professed Christ as his Lord. It is said, as the soldiers led him away to a certain appointment with death, Bonhoffer recited the words of Peter: “Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, and into an inheritance that can never perish, spoil or fade—kept in heaven for you” (1 Peter 1.3-4). Bonhoffer’s sight was not blinded by the concrete bunker that would become his grave. His sight was set on something far higher.


That which is deeper is the peace that rests within us. I heard the story, recently, of a young man who became seriously ill on a backpacking trip in the Pecos Wilderness. During the middle of the night, he was struck by a life-threatening case of high altitude sickness. His five friends had to literally carry him off the mountain in a desperate search for help. Several hours later they were able to find the emergency help he needed, but, it was a very close call. As the young man and his friends related his story to a newspaper reporter, they repeatedly brought up the subject of faith. Their trek off of the mountain and to safety was filled with uncertainty and even much fear, but their deep abiding faith kept them strong and at peace.


There is a building that blocks my view (it stands between my house and the beautiful La Plata Mountains), yet I will not allow it to spoil my perception of the awesome world that God has created. Perhaps I can carry the same outlook when faced with more significant obstacles in life.

Sunday, July 8, 2007

To the Teachers of My Children

I did not write the following. I'm not sure who did, but the sentiment is certainly shared by me and the countless others who are continually blessed by Bible class teachers.

An Open Letter to the Teachers of My Children

Two or three times a week I trust you with my most prized jewels, and those two or three times a week, you live up to that trust and return them to me—though not quite the same. Somehow you manage to take them and gradually, week by week, polish them to make them shine a little more than I sometimes think possible. You are patient and wise enough to see the potential for riches in what others may see as only rough ore.

I know you spend much unnoticed time in preparation to teach my children about Jesus. I’ve seen the literally hundreds of objects they bring home to remind them of your object lessons. You always win when I prematurely suggest discarding certain Bible class memorabilia. Much of it has a lot of your TLC, not to mention time and creativity, behind it.

I saw a note one of you wrote to my children, challenging her to be the great Christian leader and example you expect her to be. You even promised to pray for my daughter and reminded her that you are always there if she needs to talk.

Thank you for the time, the love, the prayers, the expectations and the support you devote to my children. And thank you for being a constant reflection of Jesus. They notice. And when they do, so do I.

Please resist the temptation to feel unappreciated. You’re not only appreciated but needed—and not just by my children but by me. And please don’t underestimate your influence or your teaching role on them or me as a parent. My children echo much of what you teach them, probably more than you think they hear. In fact, they remember some of your stories and illustrations long after they are promoted to another class.

As a Bible class teacher, you give my children Christ and yourself. I can’t give you enough thanks.

Saturday, July 7, 2007

The Father Had Two Sons

When we think of the story, we often forget about the older son and his sin. I am referring to the what we often refer to as Jesus’ parable of the prodigal son, recorded in Luke 15.

You know the story well. A younger son asks his father for his share of the inheritance, receives it, and then moves away from his family. He arrives in a distant country, befriends some suspect characters, and wastes away his inheritance living a wanton lifestyle. Finding himself in the depths of despair, he regains some sense of rightness and decides to return to his father and plead for forgiveness. His father welcomes him with open arms, restoring his lost son to his former place.

When we relate this story, do we not often stop here, with the celebration of the father over the return of his younger son? It seems that we conveniently forget (or, at least, downplay) the response of the older son.

Do you remember his reaction? He was upset at the gracious welcome extended by his father to his brother. After all, had this brother not forsaken his family and wasted what he had been given? Had his brother not brought shame to the family by his conduct? Jesus said, “the older brother became angry and refused to go in” to the welcome home celebration (Luke 15.28).

Perhaps we look past this chapter in the story because it is with the oldest son that we most often can relate. Let’s face it, relatively few of us have abandoned the Father’s house to live wantonly in a foreign land, but many of us have stood in judgment of those that have (either knowingly or through our neglect). Consider: Are we quick to embrace a “sinner” returning to the fold, or do we remain suspect and keep them at arm’s length? Are we quick to search them out (when they are living in that far country), or do we wait for them to come back on hands and knees?

The Father chastises the harshness of his older son. He condemns his unwillingness to forgive. Will God not respond to our unwillingness to forgive and to restore as sternly?

Friday, July 6, 2007

Honoring God 24/7!!!

So often, we think of a faithful life in the context of a religious life. In other words, our concept of being true to God is captured in the image of baptism, of attending church, and of observing the mechanics of religion. Yet, being true to God is so much more.

Being true to God is living a life that honors and glorifies God. It involves our every action, attitude, and thought. It encapsulates our every desire and pursuit. It defines who we are and is not just a part of who we are.

God does not demand our attention only for a few hours each Sunday. He expects our love and devotion 24/7! It is as Paul exhorted in Romans 12.1-2: “I urge you, brothers (and sisters), in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God—this is your spiritual act of worship. Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will.”

Thursday, July 5, 2007

Preacher Drowns at Baptism!

(I wrote this article in July 2006.)

A lack of preparation can lead to unfortunate and even harrowing results.

I nearly drowned at camp yesterday, during, of all circumstances, a baptism! It all had to do with a lack of experience, knowledge, and restraint.

The Dolores River was running high and fast yesterday. A night of heavy rain along the West Dolores fork had turned the river red with mud and much swifter than usual. Until yesterday, I had not ventured into the river, even when it was more “tranquil.” I had not yet familiarized myself with the firm footings, rocks, depressions, chasms, and currents. As I stepped into the river, I was walking like a blind man into a world I had not before experienced.

In water about four feet deep, I slipped on a rock and all of a sudden was on my side drifting rather rapidly (in my startled perception) downstream. I could not get my feet on the river bottom. I was in a desperate situation.

By the way, I am not a swimmer. I can dog paddle in the most peaceful of waters, but navigating my body in a swift river is a skill that is far from me. I managed to get myself erect and was able to baptize a special young lady into Christ and his church, yet the experience left me quite shaken and humbled.

I learned a lesson yesterday: a wise man is careful where he treads. Jesus spoke about the prudence of counting the costs of entering into an enterprise. He spoke specifically of building a barn and going to war, using the two illustrations to speak of the due diligence that should be involved in one’s decision to follow the Lord. A more general lesson is the importance of doing your homework before you enter into a project or make a commitment.

Wisdom is part foresight, part experience, part caution and reasoned thought. Mistakes are often made by the hasty, the uninformed, the rash and brash.

The right shoes don’t hurt, either! I was wearing old, worn-out tennis shoes without an ounce of tread on them.

Sunday, July 1, 2007

Are You Ready for Camp???

My love for Christian camping was instilled in me through watching my grandparents, George and Laverne Saunders. For about 25 years they served as teachers and counselors at two camps: Boiling Spings Youth Camp, located outside of Woodward, Oklahoma; and Black Mesa Bible Camp, located in the far western Oklahoma panhandle. My camping career began at Boiling Springs when I was just an eight-year-old kid. I would spend 5 summers at Boiling Springs before moving on to Black Mesa and White River Youth Camp, near Crosbyton, Texas.

Dale Hukle fanned the flame of my love for camping and introduced me to serving on a camp staff. When I was in Junior High, he started Camp Followin’, a camp in New Mexico and sponsored by Green Lawn Church of Christ. Beginning as an 8th grader, I worked at Followin’ as a staff member; I returned each summer until I was in college, eventually directing a few sessions. When I was 16 years old, Dale brought me to Camp Blue Haven, in New Mexico, where he was the director. For three summers, I washed pots and pans at Blue Haven for up to ten weeks a summer. I was paid $10 a week for my labor, but I was blessed beyond measure. Dale later introduced me to Christian Camp of the Rockies in Colorado and Soul Quest at York College. I would also spend time as a staff member at Pine Springs Youth Camp in New Mexico and Quartz Mountain Christian Camp in Oklahoma, where I directed 7 camps.

Over the past 29 years of my life, I have spent a cumulative total of over two years at summer camp. Each week is better than the one before. Even at 37 years of age, I am challenged during each camp session I attend. The time spent with God is so rich, full, and uncontested at camp. The fellowship with other, like-minded people is a tremendous blessing at camp—I don’t know how many thousands of people I have met at camp.

Are you involved with Christian camping? There is always a role for you to play: in your attendance, in your leadership, in your physical and monetary support, your held is needed. Get involved. You will be blessed more richly than you can imagine.